26.10.2020

WINE SHOP

Exclusive Wines From Small Wineries

Ancient Georgian traditional Qvevri wine-making method, inscribed in 2013 on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Ancient clay vessel. Khramis Didi Gora, 6th-5th millennium B.C.

The developed early farming culture of Shulaveri-Shomu-Tepe period, dating back to 6th-5th millennia, BC of the Neolithic period, which is found in Georgia, yields both the domesticated grapevine pips and the Qvevri-like clay wine vessel, which is adorned on both sides with a relief of grapevine canes. The above-mentioned vessel is considered to be the oldest wine vessel in the world.

Cultivated grape seeds. Dating 6th-5thmillennium B.C. ShulaveriGeorgia.

The earliest archaeological evidence of wine fermentation found has been :
GEORGIA -6000 BC
IRAN -5000 BC
GREECE -4500 BC
ARMENIA –4100 BC
SICILY -4000 BC

Wine first appeared in Europe at about 6500 BC in the Balkans, and was very common in ancient Greece, Thrace and Rome.
Wine-making in Greece goback 6,500 years and evidence suggesting wine production confirm that Greece is home to the second oldest known grape wine remnants discovered in the world.
The earliest in fluences of viticulture on the Italian peninsula can be traced to Ancient Greeks and Etruscans.

Appolo of Rhodes and Strabon and Procopius of Caesaria used to mention in their works that it was the Transcaucasus, especially Georgia, which was the native land of the first known cultured grape varieties.

Xenophon(401-400) – that Caucasian tribe who lived in the Black sea coast prepared strong wine.

When Jason and  Argonauts arrived in Colchis to claim the Golden fleece they witnessed many wonders and among them hanging vineyards and fountains that spurted wine.

Our ancestors used to drink the wine that is mentioned as “fragrant wine” in the great Homer’s “Odyssey”.
     

Jan Charden (French traveler, jeweler and painte of the 17th century) – there was no other country in the world in which wine was so good and drunk so amply, as in Georgia.

Jan Goldheimer in his “Concise Dictionary of drinks” lists up to 40 kinds of Georgian wines.